Pre-Diabetes

Pre-Diabetes

Pre-Diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a condition with which blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but are not yet high enough for a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes to be given. Although not everyone with pre-diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes, many will.

In many nations, pre-diabetes has reached epidemic proportions. For example, a UCLA study shows that in California alone, 13 million adults are pre-diabetic and 2.5 million, (or 9% of the population,) is type 2 diabetic. The two groups represent 15.5 million people (55 percent of the state’s population). Apply this equation to the nations where cases are rampant, and the figure worldwide becomes staggering. The same UCLA study found that 30% of pre-diabetics will acquire full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years of diagnosis and the remaining 70% will develop it in their lifetime; which means, if you are pre-diabetic and follow the same trajectory that led you to become pre-diabetic, at some point, you will become diabetic.

Pre-diabetes is taken for granted, so much so that the term is not even recognized by the World Health Organization. However, the term is slowly gaining ground amongst healthcare professionals.

Pre-diabetes is a progressive condition. When pre-diabetes is not dealt with in its early stages, the condition often progresses into type 2 diabetes. Another name for pre-diabetes is borderline diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can also progress and develop into type 1 diabetes.